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De Lux – Voyage

April 23rd, 2014
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Senseless Sensibility

A couple of L.A.-area skater kids get together and start making music — a California story if there ever was one. With a kind of dance-heavy disco-funk sound, they’re already drawing comparisons to LCD Soundsystem and the legendary Talking Heads. With that kind of hype floating around, people are almost legally required to take notice of a record like De Lux’s first full-length release, Voyage. Read more…

By Sean Taras Posted in Reviews

Kelis – Food

April 23rd, 2014
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Dinner Is Served

Take in Kelis’ Food — a thirteen-course album titled with numerous food references. Sadly, there is no sign of “Milkshake.” Completely laid-back, the album delivers a soul-food like listening — funky bass lines and horn sections complete with ’70s throwback feels. Read more…

By Stefanie Martinez Posted in Reviews ,

Reality Grey – Define Redemption

April 23rd, 2014
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Reality Grey Is A Band To Listen For

There isn’t a ton out there about Reality Grey (at least in the American English internet world), but here’s the background: they are five average guys who seemed to have come out of nowhere. Define Redemption, however, just put them squarely on the online map. Started in 2004, Italian metal band Reality Grey is now on their second full-length album and fourth release to date. Read more…

By Birdie Garcia Posted in High Fidelity, Reviews

Wyrd Visions – Half-Eaten Guitar

April 23rd, 2014
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A Resissue Not to Be Missed

Wyrd Visions is Colin Bergh, performing live and in the studio with Matt Smith, Owen Pallett, Jennifer Castle and members of Grizzly Bear. Originally, back in 2005, they performed in a group known as Awesome and the members would open the show with their individual solo acts and then they would drone into the group’s improvised percussion-based music. Bergh’s non-improvised music would eventually become Half Eaten Guitar, which he performed by himself behind a curtain on stage with strobe lights projecting his shadow and fog machines to add to the effect. After his first show, he got an offer to record his music from Blue Fog Recordings. The record Half-Eaten Guitar was released in 2006 until it went out of print. It is now being reissued by P.W. Elverum & Sun, Ltd., a truly interesting label, that alone is worth checking out. Read more…

By Jody Poczik Posted in Reviews

Japanther – Instant Money Magic

April 23rd, 2014
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The Colors of Money

On Instant Money Magic, Brooklyn-based musicians and art-punk wizards Japanther toss off their 13th record in 12 years, bathing themselves in a jovial push of spastic explosions that eat away at the flesh in the most pleasant of ways. Members Ian Vanek and Matt Reilly have built songs that almost never reach the two-minute mark, but the result isn’t some ADHD-laden mass of irascible punk. Instead, it’s a hodge-podge of soundscapes and hooks that coalesce occasionally into a brilliant array of color. Read more…

By Aaron Vehling Posted in Reviews

TEEN – The Way and Color

April 23rd, 2014
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Chilled Out

On their second full-length album The Way and Color, Brooklyn quartet TEEN delve deep into the realm of psychedelia-influenced pop, infusing their songs with winding, colorful melodies that will leave you wishing for a real modern day Woodstock, headbands and peace signs (and maybe some glow sticks) and all. Read more…

By Charlee Redman Posted in High Fidelity, Reviews ,

The Afghan Whigs – Do to the Beast

April 23rd, 2014
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“I’ll Have You Know I’ve Come to See You Die”

A lot of bands cite The Afghan Whigs as a heavy influence on their music. Hailing from Cincinnati, the band reached popularity in the early ’90s and were signed to Seattle’s famous Sub Pop Records (during the height of the Nirvana era, no less). Despite this, The Afghan Whigs never made it too far past their cult following and underground fame. While the band came together in the mid-2000s to play a few big festivals and release a few tracks, it’s been 16 years since their last full-length release. But now, they’re ending the streak with their latest album Do to the Beast. Read more…

By Nicole Goddeyne Posted in Reviews ,

Asher Roth with Chuck Inglish, Live at The Troubadour

April 23rd, 2014
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The Troubadour was packed like a can of sardines. Things started off with a classic DJ set– old school Snoop Dogg, Dr. Dre and newer-school Kendrick Lamar. Chuck Inglish was poetic but brought serious hip-hop energy; he knows what to say and how to say it smooth. His style is genuine and reminiscent of early Beastie Boys, which was very effective for keeping the audience excited and entertained. He requested early on to use “that disco ball with some lights shining on it,” making everyone downstairs cheer and wave their hands up while the crowded balcony was filled with listeners dancing on the bleachers. Read more…

By Risa Wesley Posted in Reviews, Show Reviews ,

Lacuna Coil – Broken Crown Halo

April 22nd, 2014
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Broken Circles

On Lacuna Coil’s seventh studio album Broken Crown Halo, we find them sticking to the formulas that got them through the late nineties nu-metal explosion. The band’s core members, Cristina Scabbia on lead vocals and Andrea Ferro backing vocals, have remained after over 15 years. Even now they continue to put out music that has been giving fans exactly what they want every time. Read more…

By Brian Adler Posted in Reviews ,

The Birds Of Satan – The Birds Of Satan

April 22nd, 2014
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Love of Influence

Foo Fighters frontman and Birds of Satan drummer-frontman Taylor Hawkins must’ve had a blast recording the new supergroup on the block’s debut LP. The self-titled album is a smorgasbord of Hawkins & Co.’s influences and preferences; a joyous seven tracks of surprisingly poppy, slightly careening genres that mix and mingle with mostly smooth results. Opener “The Ballad of the Birds of Satan” goes down easy, a moody piece of epic guitar work and wailing vocals that’s not even close to a calling card for the band. By the time “Thanks for the Line” kicks into high gear, the metal tinges have been replaced by more of a Sammy Hagar vibe. Read more…

By April Siese Posted in Reviews , , ,