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Harem Scarem – Thirteen

December 19th, 2014
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Scarem Takes Em Back…

Los Angeles. The Strip. Hair Spray. Make up. Long Hair. Harem Scarem takes you back to a much simpler time. Where guys sang harmonies and you had to dress up to play music. Only difference? They’re from Canada and it’s 2014. Read more…

By Brian Adler Posted in Reviews

Yo La Tengo – Extra Painful

December 18th, 2014
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Wipe Off The Dust

Although Yo La Tengo’s latest release, Extra Painful, is a reissue of an album they made twenty years ago (Painful), it still feels like a new batch of songs. It partly is -  they’ve added a bonus disc with ten new tracks of demos, instrumentals and live recordings that act as little toys at the bottom of the cereal box. But Extra Painful seems new because the trio has made so much music that their earlier records can get lost in the stacks, collecting digital dust in the archives and libraries until they’re forgotten. Which is why classics like Painful need to be resurfaced for a reminder: not just of their long, impressive discography, but of their influence on three decades-worth of music making. Extra Painful is that smiling shuttle on its way back to 1993. Read more…

By Jeremy Rellosa Posted in High Fidelity, Reviews

Little Boots – Business Pleasure EP

December 15th, 2014
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Boots on the Throat

“I’m not your girl in the machine/I won’t give up on my daydream”—this isn’t just a line from the title track of Little Boots’ latest EP Business Pleasure, it’s a pretty accurate summation of her career to this point. The English musician is committed to making her electro-pop thing work, yet even having production help from scions of indie-dance (DFA alum Tim Goldsworthy, as well as members of Hot Chip, Simian Mobile Disco, and Hercules & Love Affair) she can’t find the right formula. Read more…

By Adam Blyweiss Posted in Reviews

Tētēma – Geocidal

December 15th, 2014
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The Two P’s That Could

From humble beginnings in Faith No More and Mr. Bungle, Mike Patton has become a household name in the underground rock world, and has even managed to do some face-time on the movie Firecracker. However, it was easy to wonder if this dynamic musician had started losing the creative juices that cause women to swoon and men to envy after Tomahawk’s 2013 release of OddFellows – a bizarrely and troublesomely normal album. Patton’s collaboration with Anthony Pateras under the moniker of Tētēma proves that those creative juices are still flowing with abundance and that Patton may just be getting bored of Tomahawk and potentially the standard rock algorithm as a whole. Geocidal shows Patton at a new musically evolved state that only his most fervent fans will find as beautiful as it truly is. Read more…

By Colin Moore Posted in Reviews

Owen – Other People’s Songs

December 13th, 2014
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More Miss than Hit

Owen’s latest album, Other People’s Songs, is exactly that, a collection of covers of other artist’s songs. The cover album is great in concept: an artist takes songs that have influenced them and their craft, puts their own spin on them, and then releases them out into the wild. The confluence of inspiration and creativity are supposed to, in some way, shape, form, illuminate a deeper meaning, or give further insight into the song or the artist. Read more…

By Chris Ernt Posted in Reviews

Bryan Ferry – Avonmore

December 11th, 2014
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Avon-No-More.

A new listener to Bryan Ferry would think it’s outdated.  The people who know his music with Roxy Music would just know it’s him.  The new listeners might call the album dated.  In actuality, there are hints at Ferry at his best and other glimpses at something a little more underwhelming.  Nothing is bad, it’s just kind of boring on Avonmore. Read more…

By Stefanie Martinez Posted in Reviews

Eiko Ishibashi – Car and Freezer

December 11th, 2014
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The Not So Boring EP of Eiko Ishibashi

Japanese born Eiko Ishibashi began her career as a drummer, then evolved into a multi-instrumentalist.  Her latest EP, Car and Freezer, doesn’t exactly sit in any one type of genre— it’s pretty much an experimental and jazzy jam session.  The song is also half in Japanese and half in English, but you almost can’t tell with the piano and that’s not a bad thing. Read more…

By Stefanie Martinez Posted in Reviews

Silk Rhodes – Silk Rhodes

December 11th, 2014
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Rebirth of the Cool

With his latest undertaking, Michael Collins has once again managed to resurrect a long-dead genre. In the past the Baltimore native found success under the influence of another drug-laced allusion, Salvia Plath. On The Bardo Story, the only release put out under the Salvia Plath moniker, Collins took on 60s Beach Boys styled pop psychedelia like a Rhodes Scholar. Collins’ latest effort with vocalist Sasha Desree, Silk Rhodes, derives its drug-addled innuendo from a former underground black market internet site that sold illegal drugs, though the name was originally lifted from the name of ancient trade routes through China and India to the Mediterranean begun during the Han Dynasty. And rightly so should the name be steeped in history, as Collins knows how to study the past. Read more…

By Jamie Robash Posted in High Fidelity, Reviews , ,

Simple Minds – Big Music

December 10th, 2014
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Big Chaos

You know their name and their song if you were a John Hughes fan (or even just a teenager) in the 80s.  Bender walks across the field at the end of The Breakfast Club, throws a fist in the air and then “Don’t You (Forget About Me)” plays as the credits roll.  Simple Minds has been doing music for a long time.  Their new wave sound is completely identifiable and works.  That being said, their newest album, Big Music, doesn’t exactly deliver the big music it promises. Read more…

By Stefanie Martinez Posted in Reviews

Primordial – Where Greater Men Have Fallen

December 10th, 2014
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Out of the Soup, Rises a Beast

It’s enormously tough to stay relevant in music for any long period time. Tastes change, bandmates change, labels go bankrupt, or you are just plain sick of the music life. Most bands can barley make it last over a year. Read more…

By Brian Adler Posted in Reviews